Thursday, October 6, 2011

Circle of Friends

When you die, you feel as though there was some subtle change, but everything looks approximately the same. You get up and brush your teeth. You kiss your spouse and kids before leaving to the office. There is less traffic than normal. The rest of your building seems less full, as though there’s a holiday. But everyone in your office is here, and they greet you kindly. You feel strangely popular. Everyone you run into is someone you know. At some point, it dawns on you that this is the afterlife: the world is only made up of people you’ve met before.

It’s a small fraction of the world population - about 0.00002 percent - but it seems like plenty for you.

It turns out that only the people you remember are here. So the woman with whom you shared a glance with in the elevator may or may not be included. Your second-grade teacher is here, along with most of the class. Your parents, your cousins, and your spectrum of friends through the years. All your old lovers. Your boss, your grandmothers, and the waitress who served your food each day at lunch. Those you dated, those you almost dated, and those you longed for. It is a blissful opportunity to spend quality time with your one thousand connections, to renew fading ties, to catch up with those you let slip away.

It is only after several weeks of this that you begin to feel forlorn. 

You wonder what’s different as you saunter through the vast quiet parks with a friend or two. No strangers grace the empty park benches. No family unknown to you throws bread crumbs for the ducks and makes you smile because of their laughter. As you step into the street, you note there are no crowds, no buildings teeming with workers, no distant cities bustling, no hospitals running 24/7 with patients dying and staff rushing, no trains howling into the night with sardined passengers on their way home. Very few foreigners.

You begin to consider all the things unfamilar to you. You’ve never known, you realize, how to vulcanize rubber to make a tire. And now those factories stand empty. You’ve never known how to fashion a silicon chip from beach sand, how to launch rockets out of the atmosphere, how to pit olives or lay railroad tracks. And now those industries are shut down.

The missing crowds make you lonely. You begin to complain about all the people you could be meeting. But no one listens or sympathizes with you, because this is precisely what you chose when you were alive.

-David Eagleman


Notes

  1. monobored reblogged this from laughwhenwefall
  2. mizuharas reblogged this from laughwhenwefall
  3. laughwhenwefall posted this